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How Philips is Winning the Lighting Wars

How Philips is Winning the Lighting Wars

In the 1990s, Toyota decided that the best way to beat Detroit wasn't to build the bigger SUV, but to build the most fuel efficient car. Oil prices hovering around $100 a barrel have proven the wisdom of that Toyota's approach. A similar but less talked about eco-business victory is Philips' slaying of the mighty General Electric to become the United State's largest lighting supplier.

December 13, 2007

Light Your Christmas Tree With LEDs

Light Your Christmas Tree With LEDs

This year, the White House and Rockefeller Center switched their Christmas lights from incandescent mini-bulbs to light-emitting diodes. LEDs are 80 percent more energy efficient than traditional Christmas lights, making them a greener choice for holiday decorating. But it's not just energy efficiency that has them flying off the shelves at stores like Target and Home Depot.

November 29, 2007

Have a Hankering to Burn Wood in the Fireplace? Toss in a Coffee Log

Have a Hankering to Burn Wood in the Fireplace? Toss in a Coffee Log

While sipping some nice coffee in the morning chill, you might also throw on a couple of logs made from coffee grounds. Perfect. Reduced pollution and recycling rolled into logs. Java-Log has the answer with its Coffee Firelog.

November 27, 2007

Nanosolar Powersheets: The Future of Solar Power?

Nanosolar Powersheets: The Future of Solar Power?

The December 2007 issue of Popular Science contained a section called "Best of What's New 2007" in which the "Innovation of the Year" was the Nanosolar Powersheet. These solar cells would harness solar power without using a panel. Instead, thin solar cells could be easily mounted on homes in shingles or window coatings and may revolutionize how  the world gets its power.

November 26, 2007

Geneticists Create Tree That is Directly Convertible to Ethanol

Geneticists Create Tree That is Directly Convertible to Ethanol

Scientists are tinkering with tree DNA to create a new way of burning wood. No, not in a stove. In our cars and other engines driven by combustion. Using genetic engineering techniques, a team from the forest biotechnology group at North Carolina State University is trying to remake the nature of cellulose in wood. Their goal: reduce the lignin in cellulose that prevents the alchemy of turning wood to ethanol.

November 23, 2007

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